LUTHER THE GEEK (1989)

Movie Review by LL Soares

Another movie that I’d heard about for years, but hadn’t seen. LUTHER THE GEEK came out in 1989 and was directed by Carlton J. Albright. Albright also wrote the screenplay, using the name Whitey Styles. This is another one of those productions where the director only made one film. Although Albright also produced and wrote the screenplay for THE CHILDREN (1980) and produced DREAMS COME TRUE (1984). But that’s it for film credits. And this is the only where he’s the director.

LUTHER THE GEEK is yet another low-budget horror movie, but it’s got some effective scenes, and is worth checking out. The thing is, it could have been even better!

We start out with a flashback to when Luther was a kid. Little Luther (Carlton Williams, who is actually director Albright’s son) sneaks into a circus tent with a bunch of hillbilly men to see a real, live “geek.” This scene is basically just there to show us what a geek is (in case anyone didn’t understand the title). A guy in a cage is given a chicken and bites its head off and drinks its blood. Geeks did exist in carnivals in the America of yore, and were most often town drunks who agreed to play the geek in return for getting all the liquor they could drink. Anyway, little Luther is astounded by the display. At one point, though, a man knocks him to the ground and Luther hits his head, knocking out some teeth. He realizes, though, that he likes the taste of blood.

We next see a parole board discussing a candidate who is being considered for early release. Luther Watts was in prison for 20 years. The vote is close, but Luther is paroled for being a “model prisoner.” When we next see him, we learn two things. First, he replaced the teeth he lost as a kid with some metallic choppers, which he files down. Second, there is nothing normal-seeming about this guy, and there’s no reason why anyone would parole him. Did that board even meet this guy in person? To give you an idea what he’s like, Luther isn’t even called “Luther” in the credits. He’s called THE FREAK and is played by Edward Terry.

Anyway, right away, Luther gets into trouble at a supermarket, eating raw eggs and making a mess. The manager calls the police and escorts him out. On a bench beside a bus stop, he sits beside an old lady (Gail Buxton in an old lady wig), then proceeds to attack her, biting her neck viciously until she bleeds to death. Somehow, the creep gets away!

Eventually he makes his way to a lonely farmhouse, at first to chase the chickens around. There we meet Hilary (Joan Roth), a woman whose husband is either dead or away. She is terrorized by Luther, until they’re interrupted by Hilary’s college-age daughter, Beth (Stacy Haiduk) and her boyfriend Rob (Thomas Mills) who show up unexpectedly. Beth has a sexy shower scene before she and Rob join Hilary in being terrorized. At one point Luther steals Rob’s motorcycle, but can’t ride it, and cracks it up. Dumb-ass Rob chases him down to get his bike back, but learns to regret it.

There’s not much plot to this one. It’s basically a home invasion flick where a psycho breaks into a house and makes some people’s lives miserable. At one point a clueless police officer shows up (of course), played by Jerry Clarke, and let’s just say he doesn’t save the day.

At no point does Luther join a carnival and become a geek, though. He just terrorizes this poor family.

Despite the fact that they had very little to work with that makes sense, Roth and Haiduk aren’t too bad, with Roth being the best performer here, and cute Haiduk doing a decent job. Haiduk, in fact, is probably the most successful actor in this movie, since she has 70 credits on IMDB.com. LUTHER was only her second film, and she went on to get roles on the TV shows SUPERBOY (1988 – 1992, as Lana Lang), the underappreciated vampire series KINDRED: THE EMBRACED (1996), and MELROSE PLACE (in 1997).  More recently she played characters on HEROES, PRISON BREAK, and TRUE BLOOD, as well as the soap operas ALL MY CHILDREN, THE YOUNG AND THE RESTLESS, and DAYS OF OUR LIVES!

But here’s where I get to the part about it having the potential to be better. Lead Edward Terry isn’t completely awful as Luther. He is intimidating, and sometimes creepy, but he’s pretty much a one-note character. And he doesn’t speak. All he does is cluck like a chicken. This actually works in the eerie final scene, but up until then, you wonder how this guy is able to move around in the real world at all with his weird clucking and completely psychotic behavior.

It would have been a lot more effective if he was able to act normal sometimes and trick people into trusting him. As a metal-toothed, clucking freakshow, no one is going to go near him if they can help it, and there is absolutely no way this guy would be given parole. He can’t assimilate into normal society at all; he doesn’t even try. He’s more like a cartoon caricature than a real human being.

If Terry had played him as a more articulate guy who vacillated between vulnerable/normal and a complete psycho, I think the movie could have been a lot more effective, and more of a cult classic. More personality and complexity would have made this a plum role! But I can’t blame Terry, because he’s just doing what the script calls for. Albright’s script is the culprit here, keeping the movie from ever being truly scary.

Sadly, Terry was only in this one (the part was actually written with him in mind to play it), and in THE CHILDREN (mentioned previously). But he was in the art department for the John Huston film THE DEAD (1987), strangely enough.

But with a more complex character (maybe he would only start clucking when he was really going off the deep end), or at least a smarter one, LUTHER THE GEEK could have transcended its low-budget limitations. As is, the creepy-ass ending works despite the rest of the weak script, rather than because of it.

That said, I did enjoy watching this one. It’s not a total dud (and believe me, I’ve seen a lot of total duds), but I found its flaws really frustrating. Oh, and for TROMA fans, this one was released on DVD (and I’m assuming on VHS back in the day) by Troma Studios. The special effects makeup, which actually isn’t bad, is by Mike Tristano, who refused to be credited for the film. There’s also an interesting synth score by Vern Carlson, who also did the music for GALAXINA (1980).

Maybe instead of remaking classic movies that were done right the first time, someone could remake LUTHER THE GEEK and get it right. That’s what remakes should be for – helping failed films with potential reach a higher level. Unfortunately, I don’t see LUTHER getting remade anytime soon.

© Copyright 2019 by LL Soares

 

 

68 KILL (2017)

Review by LL Soares

I’ve read a few books by writer Bryan Smith, and I’ve enjoyed the hell out of them, so when I heard one of them, 68 KILL, was made into a movie, I was eager to check it out. I was happy to see that the movie keeps the unrelenting pace of the novel intact.

Chip (Matthew Gray Gubler, who also plays Dr. Spencer Reid on the show CRIMINAL MINDS), pretty much does anything his girlfriend Liza (AnnaLynne McCord, also on the show NIP/TUCK, 2007 -2009, and the reboots of 90210, 2008 – 2013 and DALLAS, 2014) tells him to. She’s incredibly hot, but also most probably insane, but he’s addicted to her and puts up with a lot to stay with her. Money’s tight for the couple, but Liza has a sideline being the lover to a rich guy. This side relationship has a motive, however, and when Liza figures out how to get into the rich guy’s safe, she and Chip go to the house for a big payday. But things go wrong. The rich guy and his wife end up dead. Liza and Chip get their money, but also end up having to figure out what to do with Violet (Alisha Boe), a young girl who was a lover of the rich guy (and his wife) who just happened to be at the house during the home invasion and is now a witness. So Liza throws her in the trunk of her car.

Since the robbery erupted in unexpected violence (thanks to the unstable Liza), Chip is constantly having second thoughts about what to do next. When Liza suggests selling Violet to her equally insane brother, Dwayne (Sam Eidson), Chip finally sees a line he’s unwilling to cross. He knocks Liza out and takes off with the car and the money, and Violet in the trunk.

Chip tries to reason with Violet and let her know he saved her, but then some new psychos show up to complicate things, when he wakes up to find himself framed for a murder, and when he tracks down his assailants, he ends up the victim of a prolonged torture session. Meanwhile, Liza is trying to track him down and get her money back, intent of administering some payback of her own.

Like the book it’s based on, 68 KILL is a fast-paced, violent roller coaster ride, and the cast helps it to all work extremely well. Gubler is believable as our hero, torn between being a wimp and a hero, and desperate to do the right thing in the face of complete lunacy. McCord is a terrific femme fatale, alternately sexy and scary. Other standouts include Boe as Violet, and Shiela Vand (“The Girl” from the movie A GIRL WALKS HOME ALONE AT NIGHT, 2014) as another maniac named Monica.

Beyond that, I don’t want to give too much away. This movie has a lot of twists and turns, and some surprises, and it’s better to just sit back and experience it for yourself. I think this is a terrific little movie, and I hope it leads to more Bryan Smith adaptations. The dude has a very cinematic style that is very compatible with movies.

68 KILL is directed (and has a screenplay by) Trent Haaga, who previoiusly directed the movie CHOP (2011). He also wrote movies like CHEAP THRILLS (2013) and DEADGIRL (2008); and acted in movies like BAD MATCH (2017), BLOOD SHED (2014) and EASTER BUNNY, KILL! KILL! (2006). Haaga does a fine job bringing Smith’s novel to the screen.

I give 68 KILL a score of three and a half knives.

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© Copyright 2018 by LL Soares